Book Series Corpus Christianorum in Translation , vol. 41

Saewulf, John of Würzburg, Theoderic

Three Pilgrimages

Reginald Denys Pringle

  • Pages: 300 p.
  • Size:156 x 234 mm
  • Illustrations:7 maps b/w
  • Language(s):English
  • Publication Year:2022


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  • ISBN: 978-2-503-59372-2
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This edition presents English translations of the accounts of three important 12th-century travellers to the Holy Land, the Anglo-Saxon Saewulf and the Germans John of Würzburg and Theoderic, based on the Latin texts edited by R.B.C. Huygens (CCCM 139).

BIO

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his more recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a book of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013).

Summary

This edition presents English translations of the accounts of three important twelfth-century travellers to the Holy Land, the Anglo-Saxon Saewulf and the Germans John of Würzburg and Theoderic, based on the edition of the Latin texts. Saewulf travelled to the Holy Land soon after its capture by the First Crusade in 1099. His travelogue, framed by accounts of his outward sea journeys from southern Italy to Jaffa and back to Constantinople, describes the buildings and holy sites of Jerusalem and its surrounding countryside as they appeared in the early years of the Frankish kingdom, before the major building works that characterized the short century of Christian rule over the city were fully under way. In contrast, the two German descriptions give more detailed accounts of the transformation that the city and surrounding landscape had undergone and of the new churches and monasteries and their artistic programmes that had been created by the 1160s and 1170s. The translated texts are preceded by an introduction placing the texts in their historical context and are accompanied by brief explanatory notes with bibliographical indications for further information.