Book Series Rencontres de Philosophie Médiévale , vol. 25

Tolerance and Concepts of Otherness in Medieval Philosophy

Acts of the XXI Annual Colloquium of the Société Internationale pour l’Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale, Maynooth, 9–12 September 2015

Michael William Dunne, Susan Gottlöber (eds)

  • Pages: xxiv + 448 p.
  • Size:156 x 234 mm
  • Language(s):English, German, French
  • Publication Year:2022


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This volume sheds new light on the development of the perception of the other within the different philosophical, religious and cultural traditions in the late Middle Ages and Early Modern era, in both Christian and Arabic thought, by considering not only the theological background but also the philosophical presuppositions of the concepts which then were used to develop various apologetic writings and theological treatises which dealt with the questions of cultural and religious difference.

BIO

Michael W. Dunne is a professor of Medieval Philosophy at Maynooth University Ireland. He completed his PhD at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. His main research areas are Medieval Irish thinkers, Oxford thought in the 13th and 14th centuries, Richard FitzRalph, philosophy of religion, and the relationship between religion, rights, and toleration.

Susan Gottlöber is senior lecturer in Philosophy at Maynooth University Ireland. She completed her Magister and PhD studies at Technische Universität Dresden, Germany. Her main research interests are philosophy and history of toleration, value theory, and philosophical anthropology with a focus on inter-subjectivity, individuality, embodiment, and human nature in the context of biology, culture, and technology.

Summary

The proceedings of the S.I.E.P.M. Colloquium at Maynooth published in this volume shed new light on the development of the perception of the other within the different philosophical, religious, and cultural traditions in the late Middle Ages as well as the early modern era in both Christian and Islamic thought.  The contributions consider not only the theological background but also the philosophical presuppositions of the concepts which were used to develop various apologetic writings and theological treatises that dealt with questions of cultural and religious difference. The rich and diverse medieval and early modern tradition of engaging with the other and the arguments for or against toleration on topics that are equally diverse are discussed with reference to both the Western and Eastern Christian tradition, to the contributions of Islamic Thinkers on the topic, and to the flourishing tradition of a constructed interreligious dialogue such as that between Christians and Jews. Finally, this book includes a number of important investigations exploring the relationship between toleration and rights not only within Europe but also in the lands of the so-called new world and its indigenous peoples where arguments of exclusion were grounded intheories such as grace-based dominium.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acknowledgments
Michael W. Dunne and Susan Gottlöber
Introduction
Michael W. Dunne and Susan Gottlöber

1. David Luscombe, Tolerance and Rights 

Section One: Toleration and Otherness Between East and West

2. Christopher Schabel, ‘Tolerating the Greeks? Augustinian Hermits on the Filioque from the Black Death to the Great Schism’.
3. Mikhail Khorkov, Konflikt, Toleranz und Dialog zwischen orthodoxen und katholischen Christen und Muslimen in den polemischen Schriften von Maxim Grek.
4. Jeremiah Hackett, Roger Bacon and his “Relative” Tolerance of “The Others.
5. Lidia Lanza, Utrum haeretici sint tolerandi:The Debate in the Sixteenth-Century Iberian Commentary Tradition on Thomas Aquinas’s Summa theologiae, II-II, q. 11.

Section Two: Toleration and Otherness in Islamic Philosophy

6. Terence Kleven, “Al-Fārābī’s Introduction of the Art of Dialectic in the Book of Analysis (Kitāb al-Taḥlīl) for the Evaluation of Certainty in Demonstrative Science and in Religion”.
7. Aicha Lahdhiri, How to think tolerance ( and intolerance )  through : “Fayçal al-tafriqa” of Al-Ghazâlî and  “Fasl al-maqal” of Ibn Rushd.
8. Luis Lopéz Farjeat, Al-Fārābī on Tolerance, Religious Pluralism, and Philosophical Exclusivism.

Section Three: Toleration, Recognition, and Dialogue

9. Gustavo Fernández Walker and Natalia Jakubecki, Ne infidelis transeat ex hac vita. Some remarks on the notion of tolerance and its applicability to Abelardian hermeneutics.
10. Ritva Palmen and Heikki J. Koskinen, Recognition Theory and Agreement in Conflict: The Case of Peter Alfonsi’s Dialogus contra Iudaeos. 
11. Edith Anna Lukacs, Thomas Bradwardineʼs Dialogue with Jews and Muslims in De causa Dei.
12. Kent Emery, jr., Veritas odium parit: Denys the Carthusian’s Dialogue with the Saracens.
13. Walter Andreas Euler, Dialogue and Toleration in Cusa.

Section Four: Toleration, Otherness, and the Question of Rights

14. Andrea Robiglio, Peace by Ordeal: A Note on Tolerance and Dueling in Medieval Thought
15. Virpi Makinen, Recognizing the Rights of Infidels in William of Ockham’s Ideas on Secular Government.
16. Michael W. Dunne, Richard FitzRalph on Dominium, Toleration, Rights and Otherness.
17. Thomas Dewender, Francisco de Vitoria on the Natural Rights of the People of the ‘New World’.
18. Roberto Hofmeister-Pich, Tolerance in First and Second Scholasticism—Some Major Problems.