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The multilingual Physiologus
Studies in the oldest Greek recension and its translations

C. Macé, J. Gippert (eds.)
approx. 450 p., 10 colour ill., 156 x 234 mm, 2021
ISBN: 978-2-503-58974-9
Languages: English
HardbackHardback
The publication is in production.The publication is in production. (02/2021)
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This book uncovers new material about the ancient Christian work known as the Physiologus and affords new insights into its multilingual transmission and reception. Ten chapters and accompanying new editions of sample texts treat the oldest Greek recension of the Physiologus and its early translations into Latin, Armenian, Syriac, Coptic, Ethiopic, Georgian, Arabic, and Old Slavonic. Produced by a team of specialists in these areas, the book will remain for years to come a Physiologus reference work and a model for dealing with ancient texts transmitted in multiple languages.

The Physiologus is an ancient Christian collection of astonishing stories about animals, stones, and plants that serve as positive or negative models for Christians. Written originally in Greek, the Physiologus was translated in ancient times into Latin, Armenian, Syriac, Coptic, Ethiopic, Georgian, Arabic, and Old Slavonic. Throughout its transformations and adaptations, the Physiologus has never lost its attraction.

The present volume offers an introduction to the significance of the Greek text, a new examination of its manuscript tradition, and a completely revised state of the art for each of the ancient translations. Two chapters of the Physiologus, on the pelican and on the panther, are edited in Greek and in each translation. These editions are accompanied by a new English rendering of the edited texts as well as short interpretative essays concerning the two animals.

The volume affords new insights into this fascinating book's diffusion, transmission, and reception over the centuries, from its composition (at the beginning of the third century CE in Alexandria) to the end of the Middle Ages, and across all regions of the Byzantine Empire, the Latin West, Egypt and Ethiopia, the Middle East, the Caucasus, and Slavia orthodoxa.

Sami Aydin is a lecturer in Semitic Languages at the Department of Linguistics and Philology of Uppsala University.

Shari Boodts is a researcher in Latin Patristics at the Radboud Institute for Culture and History of Radboud University in Nijmegen.

Jost Gippert is Professor of Comparative Linguistics at Goethe University in Frankfurt (Main) and a researcher at the Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures of the University of Hamburg.

Caroline Macé is a researcher at the Academy of Sciences in Göttingen (Patristics).

Gohar Muradyan heads the Department of Translated Literature at the Matenadaran, the Mesrop Mashtots Research Institute of Ancient Manuscripts in Yerevan.

Adrian Pirtea is a Marie-Skodowska-Curie Fellow in the Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Vienna.

Horst Schneider is a researcher at the Fontes Christiani Institute of the Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich.

Ana Stoykova is Professor at the Institute for Literature at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences.

Alin Suciu is a researcher at the Academy of Sciences in Göttingen (Coptic-Sahidic Old Testament).

Aram Topchyan heads the Department of Secular Literature and Philology at the Matenadaran, the Mesrop Mashtots Research Institute of Ancient Manuscripts in Yerevan.

Massimo Villa is a researcher at the University 'L'Orientale' in Naples.

Sibylle Wentker is Director for International Relations, Fellowships & Awards, and Research Funding at the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna.

Table of Contents
General introduction (Caroline Macé & Jost Gippert)
Part I: The Greek Physiologus and its translations
1. The Greek tradition
1.1. Horst Schneider (Fontes Christiani, München): Introduction to the Greek Physiologus
1.2. Caroline Macé (Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Göttingen): The oldest Greek tradition
2. The Latin tradition: Shari Boodts (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen) & Caroline Macé
1. The Ethiopic tradition: Massimo Villa (Università degli Studi di Napoli ‘L’Orientale’)
2. The Syriac tradition: Sami Aydin (Uppsala University)
3. The Arabic tradition:
3.1. Sibylle Wentker (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien)
3.2. Adrian Pirtea (Freie Universität Berlin)
4. The Armenian tradition: Gohar Muradyan & Aram Topchyan (Matenadaran, Erevan)
5. The Georgian tradition: Jost Gippert (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt)
6. The Old Church Slavonic tradition: Ana Stoykova (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia)
Part II: Editions of the chapters on the pelican and on the panther
1. Introduction to the editions
2. The pelican
Introduction
Redaction α of the first recension: Greek α, Latin y, Latin b, Armenian, Georgian, Syriac α
Redaction β of the first recension: Greek β, Latin x, Ethiopic (3 recensions), Syriac β, Arabic (2 translations), Old Church Slavonic (2 translations)
3. The panther
Introduction
Redaction α of the first recension: Greek α, Latin y, Latin b, Armenian, Georgian, Syriac α
Redaction β of the first recension: Greek β, Latin x, Ethiopic (3 recensions), Syriac β, Arabic (2 translations), Old Church Slavonic (2 translations)
Bibliography
Indices
Interest Classification:
Religion (including History of Religion) & Theology
Christian Theology & Theologians
Eastern Fathers
Western Fathers (c. 160-735)
Medieval & Modern (Indo-European) Languages & Literatures
Other Indo-European langs & lits
Comparative & cultural studies through literature
Comparative literature (general)
Classics, Ancient History, Oriental Studies
Greek literature
Greek literature of the Early Christian church
Byzantine Greek literature
Latin literature
Early Christian & Patristic Latin literature

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