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J. Kuuliala
Childhood Disability and Social Integration in the Middle Ages
Constructions of Impairments in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century Canonization Processes

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XIV+380 p., 4 b/w tables, 156 x 234 mm, 2016
ISBN: 978-2-503-55185-2
Languages: English
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Retail price: EUR 100,00 excl. tax
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Online content: http://www.brepolsonline.net/action/showBook?doi=10.1484/M.HDL-EB.5.106072
In this volume, testimonies from medieval canonization processes are (for the first time) systematically used as sources for the study of medieval attitudes and everyday life concerning physical impairments, particularly of children.

This volume offers new insights into medieval disability studies by analysing miracle testimonies from canonization processes as sources for the study of medieval attitudes to and understanding of childhood physical impairments: how they were defined, and the social consequences of childhood disability on the family, on the community, and on children themselves.

In these texts, laypeople from different social groups carefully described events leading to children’s miraculous cures of physical impairments, as well as the conditions themselves. They thus provide an exceptionally rich (yet hitherto unexplored) window into the ways in which medieval society defined, explained, and understood children’s impairments.

Besides simply describing disabilities and miraculous cures, these testimonies also reveal various aspects of everyday experiences and communal attitudes towards impaired children. The few testimonies by the children themselves offer fascinating insights into personal experiences of physical disability and how disability affected a child’s socialization and the formation of identity.

This study thus aims to tease apart the often-complex ways in which medieval society both viewed physical differences and how it chose to (re)construct these differences in the discourse of the miraculous, as well as in everyday life.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1: Family and the Conceptions of Impairment

Chapter 2: Community and the Impaired Child

Chapter 3: Reconstructing Lived Experience

Chapter 4: Conclusions: Impairment and Social Inclusion

Bibliography

Review

“I highly recommend Kuuliala's study of childhood. This work is well written and well researched. It has deep references and notes with translations of quotes and a good bibliography, making it accessible for advanced undergraduates. The book would fit comfortably in a classroom setting of medieval studies, gender studies, and the history of medieval health, religion, disabilities, family, or childhood. This work perceptively and sensitively examines the interplay between saints, the Church, children, and their families.” (Wendy J. Turner, in Sehepunkte, 17/4, 2017)

Interest Classification:
Religion (including History of Religion) & Theology
Christian devotion & forms of religious expression
Sciences & Technology
Medicine
Medieval & Renaissance History (c.400-1500)
Medieval European history (400-1500) : main subdisciplines
Social & economic history

This publication is also distributed by: ISD, Marston
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